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The first ever VOXXED Days Vienna event will run on 6th February, 2015, at CINEPLEXX WIENERBERG. This developer conference will bring together popular speakers, core developers of popular open source technologies and professionals willing to share their knowledge and experiences.
Voxxed Days Vienna is part of the Voxxed Days - a series of one day tech events organised by local community groups and supported by the Voxxed team. Sharing the Devoxx philosophy that content comes first, these events will bring together internationally renowned speakers at an even wider range of locations around the world. 
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Friday, February 6
 

09:00

Keynote: Polyglot Data
Never heard of it? I am not very surprised. We have many problems that we are forced to solve. Many concepts work in our current models, many do not. Picking the wrong model can lead to massive amounts of accidental complexity. This talk will look at how to reach the point where you stop thinking about how to force your problem into your predefined thinking and how to reach a place where you focus on how to choose the right model for the problem!

Speakers
avatar for Greg Young

Greg Young

AUTHOR OF CQRS, EventStore
Gregory Young coined the term “CQRS” (Command Query Responsibility Segregation) and it was instantly picked up by the community who have elaborated upon it ever since. Greg is an independent consultant and serial entrepreneur. He has 15+ years of varied experience in computer science from embedded operating systems to business systems and he brings a pragmatic and often times unusual viewpoint to discussions. He’s a frequent... Read More →


Friday February 6, 2015 09:00 - 10:00
Room 07

10:30

Operational Database with Elephant Memory
Nowadays there's a lot of fuzz around big data projects and large deployments of both analytical and operational datasets and applications. In such diverse, variable and voluminous environment one might be lost on the amount of options and choices for tackling a particular use cases. More often than not, the solution passes by using the right set of tools and not so much the one size fits all traditional approach.

This talk is about how MongoDB and Hadoop can be put to work together on very challenging and demanding use cases like lambda architectures, operational + analytical workloads or even realtime immediate access + long term and raw archiving deployments.
The talk consists on 3 main topics:
- Differences and complementary usage of MongoDB and Hadoop
- Real production use cases
- Small demo to demonstrate how we can easily integrate both technologies under the same deployment
The attendees will be taking home a set of real life experiences, a small demo that they can practices themselves to better understand where the 2 technologies can be of their interest and some ideas so they can explore extended usage of MongoDB with the full Hadoop stack (Spark, YARN, HDFS, Hive and PIG)

This talk is primarily oriented for development and ops teams with a small stint on use cases that might be interest for the most bizdev and architects. If you work on large datasets and operational databases, this talk is for you.

Speakers
avatar for Norberto Leite

Norberto Leite

Technical Evangelist, MongoDB
Norberto Leite is Technical Evangelist @ MongoDB. Norberto has been working for the last 5 years on large scalable and distributable application environments, both as advisor and engineer. Prior to MongoDB Norberto served as BigData Engineer at Telefonica.


Friday February 6, 2015 10:30 - 11:20
Room 09

10:30

Future of Development and the Cloud
A large change is afoot in software development. Baby steps have led the way, as evidenced by continuous delivery efforts, virtual machines, and service-oriented architecture. Leading a cloud R&D team makes it clear that the next steps in cloud development are through virtualized applications and application containers (not virtual machines). This movement has already started, as can be seen at Docker, Inc.; Twitter; foursquare; AirBnb; and Baidu, to name just a few. This session covers the future of cloud development with Docker and Mesos, how it will create a commoditized cloud solution, and how it will change software development moving forward.

Speakers

Friday February 6, 2015 10:30 - 11:20
Room 07

10:30

Evaluating persistent, replicated message queues
Messaging systems have always been an important architectural component of many systems. With the rising popularity of microservices and reactive programming, the MQ workload increases significantly, setting new requirements as to their performance and resilience.

We will take a look at a specific subset of messaging systems: ones which offer both persistence and replication. In other words, ones that will make sure that messages are not lost, even in case of hardware failure.

The evaluation will include RabbitMQ, HornetQ and Kafka, as well as a MongoDB-based queue and the as-a-service offering from Amazon, SQS. Apart from a look at their messaging protocols and semantics, we will see what is their performance, scaling characteristics and how they compare to each other.

With such information, it should be much easier to make an informed choice when looking for a messaging system for your next project!

Speakers
avatar for Adam Warski

Adam Warski

CTO, SoftwareMill
I am one of the co-founders of SoftwareMill, where I code mainly using Scala and other interesting technologies. I am involved in open-source projects, such as Hibernate Envers, ElasticMQ, Veripacks and MacWire. I have been a speaker at major conferences, such as JavaOne, Devoxx, JavaZone or JFokus. Apart from writing closed- and open-source software, in my free time I try to read the Internet on various programming-related subjects, any ideas or... Read More →


Friday February 6, 2015 10:30 - 11:20
Room 08

10:30

Making Java more dynamic
While Java’s strict type system is a great help for avoiding programming errors, it also takes away some of the flexibility that developers appreciate when using dynamic languages. By using runtime code generation, it is possible to bring some of this flexibility back to the Java virtual machine. For this reason, runtime code generation is widely used by many state-of-the-art Java frameworks for implementing POJO-centric APIs but it also opens the door to assembling more modular applications. This presentation offers an introduction to the complex of runtime code generation and its use on the Java platform. Furthermore, it discusses the up- and downsides of several code generation libraries such as ASM, Javassist, cglib and Byte Buddy.

Speakers
avatar for Rafael Winterhalter

Rafael Winterhalter

software engineer, Scienta
Rafael works as a software engineer in Oslo, Norway. He is a proponent of static typing and a JVM enthusiast with particular interests in code instrumentation, concurrency and functional programming. Rafael blogs about software development, regularly presents at conferences and was pronounced a Java One Rock Star. When coding outside of his work place, he contributes to a wide range of open source projects and often works on Byte Buddy, a library... Read More →


Friday February 6, 2015 10:30 - 11:20
Room 10

11:30

The Walking Dead - A Survival Guide to Resilient Applications
"The more you sweat in peace, the less you bleed in war" - the US marines certainly know how to deal with the unexpected. Building resilient distributed applications is not an easy task and you better prepare for failure during development. In this talk you will learn how to build event-driven applications that are resilient from the bottom up, allowing you to deal with remote services that are failing, slow or misbehaving. Even if you are just consuming data from a database over the network, this talk is for you.

The talk introduces different stability patterns and showcases them with real code, utilizing the fantastic RxJava and Hystrix libraries. Finally, you will see a resilient application in action, performing thousands of queries against a Couchbase Server 3.0 cluster while withstanding node failures and latency spikes.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Nitschinger

Michael Nitschinger

Software Engineer, Couchbase, Inc.
Michael is a engineer at Couchbase, Inc. He is the maintainer of the Couchbase Java SDK and responsible for framework integration like Spring-Data-Couchbase. He is very active in the open source community, a core member of the Netty project, and also contributing to various other projects like RxJava. He is interested in everything related to databases, distributed systems and reactive applications. He speaks regularly at conferences... Read More →


Friday February 6, 2015 11:30 - 12:20
Room 10

11:30

Modern Enterprise Java Architectures with Spring 4.1
This session presents selected Spring Framework 4 feature highlights, with a focus on the recently released Spring Framework 4.1. Topics include Spring 4's comprehensive Java 8 story, its WebSocket support, and the latest caching and messaging features in Spring 4.1 - illustrated with component code examples and noteworthy design considerations.

Speakers
avatar for Juergen Hoeller

Juergen Hoeller

Pivotal
Juergen Hoeller is co-founder of the Spring Framework open source project and has been serving as the project lead and release manager for the core framework since 2003. Juergen is an experienced software architect and consultant with outstanding expertise in code organization, transaction management and enterprise messaging.


Friday February 6, 2015 11:30 - 12:20
Room 07

11:30

Monadic Java
Category Theory is to functional programming what GoF design patterns are to object oriented programming. Since Java introduced lambda expressions, time is arrived also for Java developers to learn something more about functional programming patterns. Monads are probably the most expressive (and very likely the most misunderstood) of these patterns. So the purpose of this talk is to explain monads, clarify with very practical examples how and when they should be used, underline their advantages and show how they can be implemented in Java 8.

Speakers
avatar for Mario Fusco

Mario Fusco

Drools core developer, Red Hat
Mario is a senior software engineer at Red Hat working at the development of the core of Drools, the JBoss rule engine. He has a huge experience as Java developer having been involved in (and often leading) many enterprise level projects in several industries ranging from media companies to the financial sector. Among his interests there are also functional programming and Domain Specific Languages. By leveraging these 2 passions he also... Read More →


Friday February 6, 2015 11:30 - 12:20
Room 09

11:30

Java on iOS? Yes you can!
The goal of the RoboVM open source project is to bring Java and other JVM languages to iOS devices without compromise. With its ahead-of-time compiler, RoboVM translates Java bytecode into native code that runs directly on the CPU without the overhead of an interpreter. RoboVM provides full access to the iOS Cocoa Touch APIs directly from Java code, enabling the development of apps with truly native UIs and full hardware access. This talk introduces you to RoboVM and shows you how to get started with Java development for iOS.

Speakers
avatar for Mario Zechner

Mario Zechner

Creator of libGDX, a cross-platform game development framework for Windows, Linux, Mac OS X, iOS, Android and WebGL enabled browsers. Author of "Beginning Android Games", the best selling book on Android game development. Received a Duke's Choice Award in 2014 for libGDX. Currently working with Trillian Mobile AB on RoboVM.


Friday February 6, 2015 11:30 - 12:20
Room 08

13:20

Pushing Java applications to the Cloud

Applications are evolving from a traditional monolithic model to a microservices approach designed to be Highly Available and Scalable. Platform as a Service in general and CloudFoundry in particular has substantial industry support and enables hosting of multiple tenants and applications. CloudFoundry is supported by industry leaders such as Pivotal, Intel, IBM, HP and so on.
The session will start with a overview of CloudFoundry and how to push Java and Scala/Play applications to the cloud, literally with a push command and being able to hook up multiple services. In addition to ease of deployment, we will also look at what the CloudFoundry has to offer in terms of HA, scaling and security which is built in to the platform and how to control those knobs. We will also cover logging, CI with Jenkins and Blue/Green deployments and other mundane developer tasks that is aimed at simplifying a developer’s life, time permitting.
Attend this session for a technical overview of CloudFoundry and how to deploy Java and Scala/Play applications to the cloud and to reap the benefits of HA, scaling, security and so on that the Cloud and the PaaS has to offer.


Speakers
avatar for Rags Srinivas

Rags Srinivas

Architect/ Developer Advocate, IBM
Raghavan "Rags" Srinivas (@ragss) works as an Architect/Developer Evangelist for EMC CODE. His general focus area is in distributed systems, with a specialization in Cloud Computing and Big Data. | | Rags brings with him over 25 years of hands-on software development and over 15 years of architecture and technology evangelism experience. He is a repeat JavaOne rock star speaker award winner.


Friday February 6, 2015 13:20 - 14:10
Room 08

13:20

Java EE 8, a snapshot overview
Java EE 7 was mid 2013 and from J2EE to Java EE 7, much has changed but we are not done yet! Through the years, Java EE has always reinventing itself. Java EE 8 will be no exception to this rule! In this session, we will look at the Java EE 8 plans. We will review the various new JSRs that will be part of Java EE 8 (e.g. MVC JSR, JSON-B JSR, Security JSR, Configuration JSR...). We will obviously also looks how the existing technologies will evolves for Java EE 8 (eg. Servlet 4 with the HTTP 2 support, JMS's plan to replace Message Driven Beans, CDI/EJB alignment, etc). We will conclude by looking at how the community can get involved in those works.

Speakers
avatar for David Delabassee

David Delabassee

David is a Software Evangelist working for Oracle; his primary focus is Java on the Server-Side, i.e. Java EE. Prior to Oracle, David spent a decade at Sun Microsystems focusing on Java end-to-end (from the smart card to the high end server), related technologies and the developer tools. In his various roles, David has been involved in numerous Java projects since the early days of this technology. David lives in Belgium. In his spare... Read More →


Friday February 6, 2015 13:20 - 14:10
Room 07

13:20

Polymer like a boss
Webcomponents look super useful and easy at first, but soon one realizes it's sometimes hard to manage all the dependencies without losing control of what's going on behind the curtains. Currently, developers try to keep dependencies and imports in production to a minimum because each server request is expensive. Using webcomponents without caution can easily destroy all efforts.

At first, I want to demonstrate how a powerful and highly interactive component is built using Polymer and describe the key benefits. From there on I'll proceed in how to set up a build pipeline using Gulp, throwing tools like SASS or CoffeScript into the mix. By showing a thought-through example of how to structure one's component framework, I'll show how to get everything built production-ready. There are a lot of interesting questions awaiting and I aim to answer them.

Speakers
avatar for Roman Kuba

Roman Kuba

Lead Frontend Development, Codeship
Studied Digital Media Technology at University in St.Poelten and finished with a excellent Masters Degree in 2012. From there on I did some Freelance work with various companies and some well known clients. On the side I teach various web-related topics at my old University. | In May 2014 I started as Lead Frontend Developer at Codeship, where I am still developing cool stuff and help in succeeding a great and simple UX for complex tasks.


Friday February 6, 2015 13:20 - 14:10
Room 09

13:20

The 5 people in your organization that grow legacy code
Have you ever looked at a random piece of code and wanted to rewrite it so badly? It’s natural to have legacy code in your application at some point. It’s something that you need to accept and learn to live with. So is this a lost cause? Should we just throw in the towel and give up? Hell no! Over the years, I learned to identify 5 main creators/enablers of legacy code on the engineering side, which I’m sharing here with you using real development stories (with a little humour in the mix). Learn to keep them in line and your code will live longer!

Speakers
avatar for Roberto Cortez

Roberto Cortez

Self Employed
Freelancer, Speaker, RebelLabs Author, Blogger, Passionate Developer My name is Roberto Cortez and I was born in Venezuela, but I have spent most of my life in Coimbra – Portugal, where I currently live. I am a professional Java Developer working in the software development industry, with more than 8 years of experience in business areas like Finance, Insurance and Government. I work with many Java based technologies like JavaEE, Spring... Read More →


Friday February 6, 2015 13:20 - 14:10
Room 10

14:20

Get Back in Control of Your SQL with jOOQ
SQL is a powerful and highly expressive language for queries against relational databases. SQL is established, standardised and hardly challenged by alternative querying languages. Nonetheless, in the Java ecosystem, there had been few relevant steps forward since JDBC to better integrate SQL into Java. All attention was given to object-relational mapping and language abstractions on a higher level, such as OQL, HQL, JPQL, CriteriaQuery. In the mean time, these abstractions have become almost as complex as SQL itself, regardless of the headaches they're giving to DBAs who can no longer patch the generated SQL.

jOOQ is a dual-licensed Open Source product filling this gap. It implements SQL itself as an internal domain-specific language in Java, allowing for the typesafe construction and execution of SQL statements of arbitrary complexity. This includes nested selects, derived tables, joins, semi-joins, anti-joins, self-joins, aliasing, as well as many vendor-specific extensions such as stored procedures, arrays, user-defined types, recursive SQL, grouping sets, pivot tables, window functions and many other OLAP features. jOOQ also includes a source code generator allowing you to compile queries in modern IDEs such as Eclipse very efficiently.

jOOQ is a good choice in a Java application where SQL and the specific relational database are important. It is an alternative when JPA / Hibernate abstract too much, JDBC too little. It shows, how a modern domain-specific language can greatly increase developer productivity, internalising SQL into Java.

Speakers
avatar for Lukas Eder

Lukas Eder

Founder and CEO, Data Geekery GmbH
I am the founder and CEO of Data Geekery GmbH, located in Zurich, Switzerland. With our company we have been selling database products and services around Java and SQL since 2013. Ever since my Master's studies at EPFL in 2006, I have been fascinated by the interaction of Java and SQL. Most of this experience I have obtained in the Swiss E-Banking field through various variants (JDBC, Hibernate, mostly with Oracle). I am happy to share this... Read More →


Friday February 6, 2015 14:20 - 15:10
Room 08

14:20

Taking Lambdas and Streams to the Next Level With JDK8
JDK8 introduced Lambda expressions to the language and the Streams API which uses Lambdas to simplify bulk operations.

This talk will start with a brief introduction to the concepts of Lambdas and Streams and then delve into how to really get the most from them.  We’ll cover things like correct handling of exceptions, issues like refection and serialisation as well as discussing some complex use cases.  We’ll close with a look at some of the ways to debug the use of Lambdas and Streams.

Speakers
avatar for Simon Ritter

Simon Ritter

Simon Ritter manages the Java Technology Evangelist team at Oracle Corporation. Simon has been in the IT business since 1984 and holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics from Brunel University in the U.K. | | Originally working in the area of UNIX development for AT&T UNIX System Labs and then Novell, Simon moved to Sun in 1996. At this time he started working with Java technology and has spent time working both in Java... Read More →


Friday February 6, 2015 14:20 - 15:10
Room 07

14:20

Beyond responsive design - UI for the modern web application
Applications written for the modern web are being consumed not just on desktop browsers, but also on a myriad of other devices... even watches and glasses. If you design your application with a pc screen in mind, at worst you're either cutting your userbase in half or setting yourself up for an expensive redesign.

In this talk I'll introduce you to some modern web design constructs, and the technologies that bring them to life. Learn how to create apps that work just as well on phone, mobile and desktop with no extra effort, and without restrictive layout frameworks. Web has finally caught up with native apps... the future is now!

Speakers
avatar for Pete Smith

Pete Smith

Equal Experts
Pete is a software consultant and speaker based near London with almost 10 years of experience making web applications with ASP.net, specialising in API design and JavaScript browser-based applications. He's also a keen distributed systems enthusiast who enjoys helping clients solve their cloud-scale problems. | | He is the author of Superscribe - an open source routing framework - and HTTP query library Linq to Querystring among others... Read More →


Friday February 6, 2015 14:20 - 15:10
Room 09

14:20

The Adventurous Developer's guide to JVM Languages
Today there are over 50 actively worked JVM languages in existence today. Some have been ported to the JVM while others have been written specifically for the JVM.  This hands on session with take an introductory (but non hello, world) look at a number of JVM languages including, Java 8, Scala, Groovy, Kotlin, Ceylon, Xtend and Clojure as well as the tooling support, discussing how and why they came about along with the evolution of the languages and distinguish the innovative languages versus those which consolidate existing features from other languages. We'll cover our initial experiences including what rocked and sucked learning each one with example code snippets of a sample HTTP Server from each language.
You don't need any prior knowledge in these languages to attend the session. You will learn about why these other languages have come about, whether they are for you and hear some real life experiences of trying these languages for the first time.

Speakers
avatar for Simon Maple

Simon Maple

Developer Advocate, ZeroTurnaround
Simon is a Developer Advocate at ZeroTurnaround and founder of the vJUG (virtualJUG), in addition to being an active member of the London Java Community (LJC) organising group and LJC JCP EC committee member. Simon used to be a tester, developer and technical evangelist for IBM on the WebSphere Application Server for 12 years prior to joining ZeroTurnaround. He's married with a son and dog who he tries to spend as much quality time with as he... Read More →


Friday February 6, 2015 14:20 - 15:10
Room 10

15:40

Apache Spark 101
"Apache Spark" is a fast and general engine for large-scale data processing."

Above statement is taken from Apache Spark welcome page. It's one of those definitions that, while describing the product in one sentence and being 100 % true, tell still litle to the wondering noob.

Why take interest in Apache Spark? Apache Spark promise being up to 100x faster than Hadoop MapReduce in certain scenarios. It provide comprehensible programming model (familiar to everyone who is used to functional programming) and vast ecosystem of tools.

In my talk I will try to reveal secrets of Apache Spark for the very beginners. We will do first quick introduction to the set of problems commonly known as BigData: what they try to solve, what are their obstacles and challenges and how those can be addressed. We will quickly take a pick on MapReduce: theory and implementation.
We will then move to Apache Spark. We will see what was the main factor that drove its creators to introduce yet another large-scala processing engine. We will see how it works, what are its main advantages.

Presentation will be mix of slides and code examples.

Speakers
avatar for Pawel Szulc

Pawel Szulc

FUNCTIONAL PROGRAMMER at SLAMDATA, SlamData
Pawel Szulc is primarily a programmer. Always was and always will be. Experienced professionally in JVM ecosystem, currently having tons of fun with Scala, Clojure and Haskell. By day working on (not that) BigData problems with Akka Stream & Apache Spark, by night hacking whatever he finds interesting at that given moment. Humble apprentice of Functional Programming. Runs a blog http://www.rabbitonweb.com


Friday February 6, 2015 15:40 - 16:30
Room 10

15:40

What's new in Spring Data?
This talk will give a broad overview of the new features introduced in the latest Spring Data release trains. We will cover recent additions and improvements in Spring Data Commons - the module that's shared amongst the store specific ones. We'll then delve into the latest and greatest features of individual store modules, like JPA, MongoDB, Neo4j, Solr and the community ones as well.

Speakers
avatar for Oliver Gierke

Oliver Gierke

Spring Data Project Lead, Pivotal
Oliver Gierke is the lead of the Spring Data project at Pivotal, formerly known as SpringSource, and member of the JPA 2.1 expert group. He has been into developing enterprise applications and open source projects for over 8 years now. His working focus is centered around software architecture, Spring, REST and persistence technologies. He is regularly speaking at German and international conferences and the author of technology articles as... Read More →


Friday February 6, 2015 15:40 - 16:30
Room 08

15:40

'Quantum' Performance Effects
Nowadays, CPU microarchitecture is concealed from developers by compilers, VMs, etc.
Do Java developers need to know microarchitecture details of modern processors?
Or, does it like to learn quantum mechanics for cooking?
Are Java developers safe from leaking low-level microarchitecture details into high level application performance behaviour?
We will try to answer these questions by analyzing several Java examples.

Speakers
avatar for Sergey Kuksenko

Sergey Kuksenko

Java Performance Engineer, Oracle
Sergey works as Java Performance Engineer at Oracle. His primary goal is making Oracle JVM faster digging into JVM runtime, JIT compilets, classlibraries and etc. His favorite area is an interaction of Java with modern hardware what he is doing since 2005 when he worked at Intel in Apache Harmony Performance team. He speaks regularly at various conferences and JUGs.


Friday February 6, 2015 15:40 - 16:30
Room 09

15:40

Scala, Akka, Play: the why and how of reactive web-applications on the JVM
Over the past few years, web-applications have started to play an increasingly important role in our lives. We expect them to be always available and the data to be always fresh. This shift into the realm of real-time data processing is now transitioning to physical devices, and Gartner predicts that the Internet of Things will grow to an installed base of 26 billion units by 2020.

Reactive web-applications are an answer to the new requirements of high-availability and resource efficiency brought by this rapid evolution. On the JVM, a set of new languages and tools has emerged that enable the development of entirely asynchronous request and data handling pipelines. At the same time, container-less application frameworks are gaining increasing popularity over traditional deployment mechanisms.

This talk is going to give you an introduction into one of the most trending reactive web-application stack on the JVM, involving the Scala programming langauge, the concurrency toolkit Akka and the web-application framework Play. It will show you how functional programming techniques enable asynchronous programming, and how those technologies help to build robust and resilient web-applications.

Speakers
avatar for Manuel Bernhardt

Manuel Bernhardt

Independent Software Consultant
Manuel is an independent software consultant with a passion for building web-based systems, both back-end and front-end. He's the author of "Reactive Web Applications" (Manning) and started working with Scala, Akka and Play Framework in 2010 after spending a long time with Java. He lives in Vienna, where he is co-organiser of the local Scala User Group. He's enthusiastic about the Scala-based technologies and the vibrant community, and is... Read More →


Friday February 6, 2015 15:40 - 16:30
Room 07

16:40

Graph Databases - Only a Tool or a Data Store?

Graph databases provide a modern and efficient solution to store graph-oriented data structures naturally. Many structured and associated data are stored schema free in vertices (nodes) and edges (relations) without using an index to query. With the known algorithms from graph theory, we can succeed to answer our questions on the connected data.

This talk provides an introduction to the topic of graph databases and compares them with relational databases. Issues such as data modelling, querying, data import and typical use cases are considered and compared in detail. In addition, issues such as the integration into the system environment, etc. are covered das well.


Speakers
avatar for Patrick Baumgartner

Patrick Baumgartner

Software Craftsman, 42talents
Patrick Baumgartner works as a passionate software craftsman at 42talents and builds software with Java/JEE, Spring Framework, OSGi, NoSQL databases and other open source technologies. Since he got in touch with Neo4j a few years ago, he sees the whole world as one big connected graph and loves to talk about it. | Patrick is a host of the Neo4j Zurich and the Software Craftsmanship Zurich Meetup group and is engaged in the agile community in... Read More →


Friday February 6, 2015 16:40 - 17:30
Room 08

16:40

Candies for everybody: hacking from 9 to 5
Over the latest years, the line between offline and online world becoming thinner, practically disappearing. Today, thanks to the new technologies, is possible take the control of all the things of your offline world using the power of the online world.
On this talk we study the different real examples of hardware devices and the interconnection with different SDKs for having successful tools. Moreover, we’ll do a tour seeing the crazy experiments made by the Braintree_Dev team, from a lighting t-shirt to a remote coffe machine or the dance monkey, showing another way to learn new languages and testing new devices.
Also, we’ll se a real example of integration, having on the stage a real prototype of sweet dispenser machine with Spark that works dispensing sweets after anybody pays using the mobile device (as real demo on the stage).
Say hello to the fusion between APIs and & IOT!

Speakers
avatar for Alberto Lopez

Alberto Lopez

EMEA Developer Advocate, Braintree_Dev
I am a passionate of innovation, mobility, Internet and commerce, working as EMEA Developer Advocate at Braintree Dev. This allows me to show that the crazy ideas that everybody could have in mind can be turned into handy solutions. | Every day learning new things and trying to share them to the others, and everyday hungry for dealing with new challenges on the tech world, testing products, languages and in general, playing with all the stuff... Read More →


Friday February 6, 2015 16:40 - 17:30
Room 09

16:40

Building fault tolerant microservices in Java
Are you developing applications that communicate over a network? Of course you are! This talk will take you through all the ways you can build fault-tolerant applications and how, once you get your team in the mindset that everything will eventually fail, dealing with the failures gracefully is no more work than building fragile applications

The topics covered will be:
- What to do when one of the dependencies fails to respond in time
- When to use network level time outs vs application level timeouts
- What to monitor and how to monitor it, e.g connection pools, thread pools, queue sizes, latency
- How to test for when the network is slow or saturated
- How to test for when traffic is lost in transit
- How to train your stakeholders to expect failure and get them to agree to fallbacks meaning they can choose availability over other requirements
- When to use automated circuit breakers vs manual kill switches
- Tips, hints and tricks for doing all of the above in Java

The topics covered are especially relevant if your application has a lot of dependencies that it communicates with over a network i.e. microservices. It is even more applicable if your application is deployed to an environment which is prone to failure e.g. a "cloud".

With supporting powerpoint slides, I'll cover the theory and motivation behind moving to a more distributed architecture and then go through the pitfalls and the strategies for improving fault-tolerance, backed up with real examples from Sky.

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Batey

Christopher Batey

Software Engineer/Evangelist, DataStax
Christopher Batey is a Software Engineer by trade and is currently employed by DataStax a Technical Evangelist for Apache Cassandra, previously he was Senior Software Engineer at BSkyB where he spent his time designing and developing their next generation platform that backs Sky Go, Now TV etc. He is a keen blogger, tweeter and open source advocate.


Friday February 6, 2015 16:40 - 17:30
Room 10

16:40

Coding Culture
One day we woke up and realized that our days are filled with all kind of stuff unrelated to code or product, that our goals are driven by product owners, and that our code design is dictated by architects trying to tell us how we should solve problems. A strong coding culture gives the power back to the developer to concentrate on one thing: Create awesome stuff!
Imagine a culture where the input of the whole organization turns an individual idea into a user story in just a couple of hours; where everybody's goal is to make the customer awesome, and where you work on stuff you love instead stuff you loathe. A great coding culture concentrates on making developers productive and happy by removing unnecessary overhead, bringing autonomous teams together, helping the individual programmer to innovate, and raising the awareness among the developers to create better code.
I will talk about how to establish and foster a strong engineering-focused culture that scales from a small team to a huge organization with hundreds of developers. I'll give lots of examples from our experience at Atlassian to show that once you're working in a great coding culture, you won't want to work anywhere else.

Speakers
avatar for Sven Peters

Sven Peters

EVANGELIST at ATLASSIAN, Atlassian
Sven is a software geek working as an Evangelist for Atlassian. He started with Java development in 1998 and has been programming for longer that he'd like to admit. Besides coding his passion is getting the right tools into the hands of those who need it.


Friday February 6, 2015 16:40 - 17:30
Room 07